Every day I'm tumblin'
micdotcom:

If there was ever a sign that today’s job market is screwed for young people, it’s this GIF

According to the most recent census, 113,000 janitors in the U.S. have at least a bachelor’s degree. And, over 18,000 have a master’s degree or Ph.D.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

If there was ever a sign that today’s job market is screwed for young people, it’s this GIF

According to the most recent census, 113,000 janitors in the U.S. have at least a bachelor’s degree. And, over 18,000 have a master’s degree or Ph.D.

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

robertboyds:

tuulikki:

wuglife:


Linguistics map of the Iberian Peninsula 1000-2000 AD

When language isolates are discussed, people often assume they are some weird, unique language that just sprung out of nowhere. It’s much more likely that these languages (like Basque) were parts of must larger families that died out. In this gif, you can see how Castilian overwhelms Iberia, which had been primarily speaking Arabic - Mozarabic. Even at that time, Basque was already a fairly small language. So what did the language landscape look like before Arabic - Mozarabic was the dominant language family?
I don’t know, but language has been around a lot longer than we have historical accounts, and it’s reasonable to think that Basque’s language family was once spoken in a much wider area. Who knows, maybe it originates from a language family that dominated Europe before Germanic and Romance languages existed. In any case, we no longer can trace it back to connect it to the languages in Europe today.

robertboyds , you may find this interesting.

Yes, thank you! :D

robertboyds:

tuulikki:

wuglife:

Linguistics map of the Iberian Peninsula 1000-2000 AD

When language isolates are discussed, people often assume they are some weird, unique language that just sprung out of nowhere. It’s much more likely that these languages (like Basque) were parts of must larger families that died out. In this gif, you can see how Castilian overwhelms Iberia, which had been primarily speaking Arabic - Mozarabic. Even at that time, Basque was already a fairly small language. So what did the language landscape look like before Arabic - Mozarabic was the dominant language family?

I don’t know, but language has been around a lot longer than we have historical accounts, and it’s reasonable to think that Basque’s language family was once spoken in a much wider area. Who knows, maybe it originates from a language family that dominated Europe before Germanic and Romance languages existed. In any case, we no longer can trace it back to connect it to the languages in Europe today.

robertboyds , you may find this interesting.

Yes, thank you! :D

newenglandisbeautiful:

Camden, Maine by BenjaminMWilliamson on Flickr.
Maine
thekaleidoscopediaries:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?
morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

It is a literal bear.
Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.
But wait….

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.


i had to read this book in uni for my first year Canadian literature class. When we first heard of it we were like, “Oh the Bear’s a metaphor or some shit.” but then one kid read ahead, and was like, “Guys, no, she literally fucks the bear. She fucked a bear.” 

thekaleidoscopediaries:

notpulpcovers:

Canada, eh?

morebadbookcovers:

wordsofdiana:

corpsecaddy:

So I found this harlequin romance paperback today, and normally I just toss those right over without paying them much mind, but the cover of this one made me pause. Sure that the artist was just taking liberties, I checked out the back.

image

I’m dubious. I should read a passage:

image

It is a literal bear.

Okay yeah I’ll admit it I’m going to read this but only because it sounds like the most fucked up romance novel in existence.

But wait….

image

You have some explaining to do, Canada.

You guys don’t understand. Screw it being a bestseller, 50 Shades of Gray is a bestseller, this book won the Governor General’s Award. That’s the highest literary award in Canada. That’s the pulitzer prize of Canadian literature. Bear is a part of Canadian literary history.

HOLY MOLY.

i had to read this book in uni for my first year Canadian literature class. When we first heard of it we were like, “Oh the Bear’s a metaphor or some shit.” but then one kid read ahead, and was like, “Guys, no, she literally fucks the bear. She fucked a bear.” 

fuckinmiki:

State Sigils (Made on HBO’s website). Specifically the six New England States.

urgetocreate:

André Derain, Le Jardin, 1899

urgetocreate:

André Derain, Le Jardin, 1899

DSCF9123blog.jpg

Daniel Chester French, The Weaver, Peace Dale, Rhode Island, 1919.

By William Morgan

The serendipity of coming across an unexpected jewel is one of the joys of wandering around New England. One Sunday, my wife and I were driving in rural Rhode Island in search of straw bales. As we passed through Peace Dale, a village in South Kingstown, we were awestruck by a statuary group next to the library that is as distinguished as it is forgotten.

 

The Weaver is a tribute to the Hazards, mill owners and builders of this village. It also marks the decline of the region’s textile industry. An even greater loss is alluded to by sculptor Daniel Chester French’s take on a Roman funerary monument, coming on the heels of the Great War. Can anyone imagine a memorial bearing this inscription a century later?

Life spins the thread. Time weaves the patterns God designed.
The fabric of the stuff he left to men of noble mind.

DSCF9142blog.jpg

A detail of the weaver’s face from French’s The Weaver.

Caroline Hazard gave the Peace Dale memorial in honor of two brothers and her father — two Rowland Hazards and a Frederick Rowland Hazard, son and grandsons of the founder of southern Rhode Island’s largest mill complex, Peace Dale Manufacturing Company, where were more than a thousand workers were employed before the Hazards sold out in 1918. As enlightened Quakers, the philanthropic Hazards were pioneers in establishing health care, pension funds, and profit sharing, as well as quality housing for their workers. The family erected impressive masonry woolen mills over the decades, along with civic landmarks, including a church, a railroad station, and a library.

DSCF9153blog.jpg

Peace Dale worsted mill, 1872, and weaving shed, 1880.

Caroline’s brothers gave the handsome library, on whose grounds theThe Weaver stands. Although designed by Providence architects, this Romanesque pile was clearly homage to the libraries of recently deceased Boston master Henry Hobson Richardson. Charles Eliot, the noted Boston parks designer and partner of Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., laid out the library grounds. (As president of Wellesley College, Caroline Hazard hired the Olmsted firm to reshape that campus.)

DSCF9149blog.jpg

Hazard Library, Angell & Swift, architects, 1891.

With such a tradition of inspired patronage, it is hardly surprising that Caroline Hazard chose the nation’s foremost sculptor of public monuments to commemorate her family. French is most famous for his iconic statue of the Great Emancipator at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, while his handsome neoclassical women graced key Beaux-Arts buildings at the turn of the 20th century.

Yet the spirit of French’s monument to fellow modeler Martin Milmore most infuses the Hazard memorial. The poignancy of his 1893 tomb figures at Boston’s Forest Hills Cemetery — The Angel of Death Staying the Hand of the Sculptor — has been recreated in Peace Dale. Here, a feminine grim reaper offers a chilling, prophetic prompt to the classical goddess who holds out the thread to the beautiful but doomed young man.

DSCF9133blog.jpg

Detail of The Weaver, allegories of the textile industry and death.

The Weaver is a significant work of art by a major American artist. This sad but brilliant treasure is typical of the depth of richness found even in New England’s hidden corners.

 

If Daenerys went to Starbucks…
http://9gag.com/gag/aLKy54z?ref=mobile.s.fb

If Daenerys went to Starbucks…

http://9gag.com/gag/aLKy54z?ref=mobile.s.fb

mr-koo:

I wish for Mrs. Dockery to call me “Pretty”. 

design-is-fine:

Clement Dane Studio, poster artwork for Canadian Pacific, 1932. London.

The Emperess of Britain was built 1928-32. In her time, the ocean liner was the largest, fastest, and most luxurious ship between England and Canada, but also the largest ship sunk by a U-boat during WWII in 1940. Source 1+2+3

fuckinmiki:

Taken on July 4.

East Greenwich, RI.

fuckinmiki:

Taken on July 4.

East Greenwich, RI.

blastedheath:

John Nash (English, 1893-1977), The Cottage Garden, c.1930. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in.

blastedheath:

John Nash (English, 1893-1977), The Cottage Garden, c.1930. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in.